Thursday, October 21, 2021

Gabon Becomes the first African Country to Receive Payment to Protect its Rainforest

Must Read

The Duplicity Of The Buhari Led Government

Since his election in 2015, Buhari has proven to be a colossal mistake elected by the Nigerian masses. Interestingly PDP...

Namibian teenager Christine Mboma out of Olympic 400m over high testosterone levels

Namibian teenager Christine Mboma - who broke the 30-year-old world 400m Under-20s record on Wednesday - is out of...

Burundi human rights activist Germain Rukuki freed from jail

Burundian human rights activist Germain Rukuki was freed on Wednesday afternoon after spending four years in prison, his lawyer...

Gabon has become the first African country to receive payment for reducing carbon emissions by protecting its rainforest.

Gabon Becomes the first African Country to Receive Payment to Protect its Rainforest

The UN-backed Central African Forest Initiative (Cafi) has handed over $17m (£12m) – the first tranche of a $150m deal struck in 2019.

Nearly 90% of Gabon is covered by forest, which captures more carbon than the country emits.

Rainforests are vital for absorbing the globe’s climate-heating emissions.

Gabon has been able to show that it managed to reduce deforestation and so lower its carbon emissions in 2016 and 2017 compared to the previous decade, Cafi says.

As a result Norway, through Cafi, has paid Gabon $17m based on a formula relating to the number of tonnes of carbon that would otherwise have been released. The rest of the $150m should be handed over in the coming years.

READ  Valuable African Traditions Now on the Brink of Extinction

The initial payment represents just 0.1% of Gabon’s annual GDP, but Forest Minister Lee White told the BBC that it was a significant first step.

Norway has validated Gabon’s systems for monitoring deforestation and carbon emissions, which could be used to help high carbon-emitting countries pay Gabon for managing its resources in the future, the minister said.

Gabon has launched a number of conservation schemes in recent years, including the creation of 13 national parks and a project to combat illegal logging.

Nevertheless, the country wants to earn more money from timber and says it will continue to harvest trees and increase the value of the sector by processing more of the raw material at home.

The charity Rainforest Foundation UK, which works on rainforest protection and community land rights, told the BBC that while money to protect forests is important, this payment “risks being a public relations exercise”.

READ  Outcry over South Africa's multiple husbands proposal

It points to data from the monitoring group Global Forest Watch which shows that 2017 saw one of the highest rates of forest loss in Gabon since 2001.

The government says that its monitoring shows that the country can maintain its carbon stocks through sustainable forestry.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Latest News

The Duplicity Of The Buhari Led Government

Since his election in 2015, Buhari has proven to be a colossal mistake elected by the Nigerian masses. Interestingly PDP...

Namibian teenager Christine Mboma out of Olympic 400m over high testosterone levels

Namibian teenager Christine Mboma - who broke the 30-year-old world 400m Under-20s record on Wednesday - is out of the event at the Olympics...

Burundi human rights activist Germain Rukuki freed from jail

Burundian human rights activist Germain Rukuki was freed on Wednesday afternoon after spending four years in prison, his lawyer told the BBC Great Lakes. Mr...

King of Eswatini Reported To Have Fled Country Amid Protests for Democracy

King Mswati III of the Kingdom of Eswatini formerly known as Swaziland has allegedly fled the kingdom amidst pro-democracy protests that have spiraled out...

Interim government of Tigray flees as rebels seize capital

The interim government of Ethiopia’s war-hit Tigray region has fled as rebel fighters advanced into the region’s capital and the national government announced a...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -