History

Memphis Massacre of 1866: The Racial Massacre That Targeted African Americans and Exposed the Brutality of Racism

The Memphis Massacre of 1866 was a sequence of violent incidents that took place in Memphis, Tennessee from May 1 to 3, 1866, and targeted African Americans. The racial rioting resulted in 48 fatalities, several rapes, the burning of 91 homes, churches, and 12 black schools.

Madison Washington: The Man Who Led the Most Successful Slave Revolt in United States History

Madison Washington was an enslaved African who led the Creole slave revolt in November 1841, during which 18 black slaves commandeered the slave ship, the Creole. This uprising ultimately secured freedom for 128 enslaved individuals.

Sir Harry Rawson: The British Officer Behind the 1897 Benin Expedition and the Plundering of Priceless Benin Bronzes

Admiral Sir Harry Rawson was a renowned British naval officer who became famous for leading the 1897 Benin Expedition, which ended in the capture and sacking of Benin City, the eventual fall of the Benin Kingdom, and its incorporation into colonial Nigeria.

Abebe Bikila: the Ethiopian Gold Medalist Who Ran Barefoot at the 1960 Rome Olympics

Shambel Abebe Bikila was the first Ethiopian Olympic gold medalist, winning his and Africa's first gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome while running barefoot.

Remembering the Knoxville Race Riot of 1919

The Knoxville riot of 1919, was a tragic event that unfolded during the Red Summer, a period of heightened racial tensions across the United States

Juan Latino: The Professor of Ethiopian Descent Who Taught at the University of Granada in the 16th Century

Juan Latino was an Ethiopian-born professor who taught at the University of Granada in the sixteenth century. He is widely regarded as a trailblazer, having been the first African to attend a European university.

Prudence Crandall: The Educator Imprisoned for Teaching African American Children in 1834

Prudence Crandall was an American schoolteacher and activist who founded the Canterbury Female Boarding School in Canterbury, Connecticut, in 1831, sparking a chain of events that challenged the norms of the day.

Gag Rule: The Rules That Silenced Discussions About Slavery in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1836

The gag rule was a series of rules that forbade the raising, consideration, or discussion of slavery in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1836 to 1844

Mbuya Nehanda: The Heroine Executed for Leading an Uprising Against the British in Zimbabwe in 1898

Nehanda Charwe Nyakasikana, or Mbuya Nehanda was a powerful spirit medium, and heroine of the First Chimurenga, the revolt against the British South Africa Company in Matabeleland.

The Pearl Incident: The Largest Nonviolent Escape Attempt by Enslaved Africans in U.S. History

The Pearl Incident which took place in 1848, marked the largest recorded nonviolent escape attempt by enslaved Africans in U.S. history.
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Isaac Simmons: The Black Minister Brutally Lynched by a White Mob for His 220-Acre Land in 1945

Reverend Isaac Simmons was a Black preacher and farmer from Amite County, Mississippi, who was murdered by a gang...
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