History

Memories of Slavery: The Dark History of Sierra Leone’s Bunce Island

Bunce Island was a former slave castle located in the Sierra Leone River and was one of the largest centers of the transatlantic slave trade in West Africa. During the 17th and 18th centuries, thousands of Africans were captured,...

‘Hit the Nigg*r Baby’ – How African-Americans Were Used as Human Targets in the 1880s

The African Dodger, also known as the "hit the Nigg*r baby" was a racist carnival game that was popular in the United States in the late 19th century. The African Dodger was played at fairs, carnivals, and other public...

761st Tank Battalion: The Segregated Unit of the United States Army During World War II

The 761st Tank Battalion, also known as the "Black Panthers," was a unit of the United States Army during World War II. This unit was comprised primarily of African American soldiers and was one of the first all-black armored units to see combat.

Seriki Williams Abass: The Former Slave Who Later Became A Renowned Slave Merchant in Yorubalamd

Seriki Williams Abass was a renowned slave merchant during the 19th century and a former paramount ruler of Badagry.

Sarah Forbes Bonetta, the Enslaved Yoruba Princess Who Was Gifted to the Queen of England in 1850

Born Omoba Aina, Sarah Forbes Bonetta was an Egbado princess of the Yoruba people, who was taken to England and presented to Queen Victoria as a “gift” from the king of the Blacks to the Queen of the Whites.

Anti-amalgamation Law of 1664, the Law That Prohibited Interracial Marriages in US

The Anti-Amalgamation law of 1664 was a law passed in the colony of Maryland that prohibited interracial marriages between European colonists and enslaved Africans.

Transatlantic Slavery: How European Offers of Weaponry Lured African Chiefs into Slave Trade

It has been a pile of decades since the abolition of slavery. However, in another context, one can argue that what happened to slavery wasn't abolition but evolution. This article will not dwell on this debate as it is...

Askari: The Indigenous Soldiers of European Colonial Armies in Africa

Askaris were soldiers recruited from local populations in Africa to fight for European colonial powers during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Great Slave Auction of 1859: The Largest Single Sale of Enslaved Africans in U.S History

The Great Slave Auction of 1859 also called the weeping time was a significant event in American history, as it marked the last large-scale sale of enslaved people in the United States.

Slave Brokerage: How Early U.S. Newspapers Facilitated The Sales And Purchase Of Slaves

For over a century, beginning from the 1700s, the publication of slave sales ads was among the most lucrative sources of income for newspaper owners.
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Memories of Slavery: The Dark History of Sierra Leone’s Bunce Island

Bunce Island was a former slave castle located in the Sierra Leone River and was one of the largest...
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