History

The Newark Riots of 1967 and how it was Ignited by Police Brutality

The Newark riots, which stand as one of the most devastating urban uprisings in American history, were part of a wave of riots in the 1960s that were sparked by long-standing racial tensions, economic deprivation and ignited by a...

Autherine Lucy: The Black Woman Whose Admission to the University of Alabama Sparked a Riot in 1956

Autherine Juanita Lucy was an American activist whose admission to the University of Alabama sparked a riot, leading to her suspension and eventual expulsion from the school in 1956. Born on October 5, 1929, in Shiloh, Alabama, Autherine Lucy was...

Jesse Thornton: The Alabama Man Who Was Lynched for Not Addressing a White Man as “Mister”

On June 22, 1940, in the small town of Luverne, Alabama, Jesse Thornton, a 26-year-old African-American man, was lynched for allegedly failing to address a white man as "Mister." Thornton managed a chicken farm and had gone to town...

Chief Kapeni: The African Leader Whose Trust in the British Led to His Downfall and the Subjugation of His People

Chief Kapeni was a prominent African chief who, in the 1800s, made a decision that would eventually lead to his death and the capture of his kingdom. Ignoring the warnings of neighboring chiefs, he gave British missionaries a large...

South Carolina Negro Act of 1740: The Code that Prohibited Enslaved Africans from Learning to Read

Passed by the South Carolina Assembly on the 10th of May, 1740, the Negro Act was a comprehensive set of laws aimed at controlling and subjugating the enslaved population within the colony. Among its most notorious provisions was the...

Remembering George Meadows: The African American Man Lynched Under False Allegations of Rape and Murder in 1889

Lynched on January 15, 1889, in Jefferson County, Alabama, Meadows became a victim of a society plagued by racism, false accusations, and mob justice. The events leading to Meadows's lynching began on January 14, 1889, when a white woman reported...

Ahmadou Bamba: The Senegalese Leader Exiled by the French for Inciting “Anti-Colonial Disobedience” in 1895

Ahmadou Bamba, also known to followers as "The Servant of the Messenger" and Serigne Touba or "Sheikh of Touba," was a religious leader in Senegal and the founder of the large Mouride Brotherhood (the Muridiyya) who was exiled by...

The Volta-Bani War of 1915: French West Africans’ Rebellion Against French Military Conscription During World War I

The Volta-Bani War was a major yet obscure anti-colonial rebellion which took place in French West Africa, in the areas of modern Burkina Faso and Mali between 1915 and 1917. This conflict emerged as indigenous African forces, uniting various...

Arthur St. Clair: The Black Minister Lynched for Presiding Over a Mixed-Race Marriage in 1877

Arthur W. St. Clair was an African-American leader whose life was tragically cut short in 1877. His crime? Presiding over the marriage of a black man and a white woman. St. Clair was born into slavery on the May plantation...

Lacy Mitchell: The Man Lynched for Testifying Against Two White Men Accused of Raping a Young Black Girl in 1930

Lacy Mitchell, was a 53-year-old farmer residing in Gwinnett County, Georgia, who met a tragic fate in 1930 at the hands of two white men, Jack Bradley and O. E. Allen for testifying against two white men accused of...
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The Newark Riots of 1967 and how it was Ignited by Police Brutality

The Newark riots, which stand as one of the most devastating urban uprisings in American history, were part of...
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