Slavery in the US

Anti-amalgamation Law of 1664, the Law That Prohibited Interracial Marriages in US

The Anti-Amalgamation law of 1664 was a law passed in the colony of Maryland that prohibited interracial marriages between European colonists and enslaved Africans.

The Great Slave Auction of 1859: The Largest Single Sale of Enslaved Africans in U.S History

The Great Slave Auction of 1859 also called the weeping time was a significant event in American history, as it marked the last large-scale sale of enslaved people in the United States.

Slave Breeding in the US: How Enslaved Africans were Bred Like Livestock in the 19th Century

Slave breeding was a practice that occurred in the antebellum United States, in which slave owners would breed enslaved Africans for the purpose of increasing their economic value as property

Samuel Burris, the Abolitionist Who Was Imprisoned for Helping Slaves Escape to Freedom in the 19th Century

Samuel D. Burris was a prominent figure in the abolitionist movement in the United States during the mid-19th century.

Drapetomania: the Scientific Justification of Slavery and Abuse of Enslaved Africans in America

Drapetomania was a pseudoscientific theory that was used in the mid-19th century to explain why enslaved African Americans would attempt to escape slavery in the United States.

Nat Turner, the Preacher Who Led a Slave Rebellion in Virginia in 1831

Nat Turner was an enslaved African-American preacher who led a rebellion of enslaved and free Black people in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1831.

Omar Ibn Sayyid, the Fula Islamic Scholar Who Was Captured and Sold in the United States in 1807

Omar ibn Sayyid was a Fula Islamic scholar from Futa Toro in Senegal, who was enslaved and transported to the United States in 1807.

Fenda Lawrence, the African Slave Trader Who Relocated to the US in the 18th Century

Fenda Lawrence was an African slave trader who operated in the Saloum town of Kaur in present-day Senegal.

‘Hit the Nigg*r Baby’ – How African-Americans Were Used as Human Targets in the 1880s

The African Dodger, also known as "Hit the Nigger Baby" was a very popular game in local fairs, carnivals, and circuses in the United States from the 1880s up to the 1960s.

Issac Woodard: the African-American Veteran Who Was Attacked and Blinded by Police Officers in 1946

Isaac Woodard Jr. was a decorated World War II veteran who was brutally beaten and blinded while still on uniform on February 12, 1946, just hours after he was honorably discharged from the United States Army.
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Seriki Williams Abass: The Former Slave Who Later Became A Renowned Slave Merchant in Yorubalamd

Seriki Williams Abass was a renowned slave merchant during the 19th century and a former paramount ruler of Badagry.