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Slavery in the US

Slave Brokerage: How Early U.S. Newspapers Facilitated The Sales And Purchase Of Slaves

In the earliest history of US stock brokerage, one stock stood out both in nature and the revenue it generated – humans. The more preferred name for the merchandise was slave, and the stock market were the first US newspapers

Slavery in the US: How Black Women Resisted Slave Breeding By Using Cotton Roots as Contraceptives

Throughout the antebellum era, slave breeding was a highly profitable investment. Slaves were scarce. The cheap labor they provided in plantations wasn’t cheap anymore and slave children sold like wildfire. The couple of years following the prohibition of slave importation...

Issac Woodard: the African-American Veteran Who Was Attacked and Blinded by Police Officers in 1946

Isaac Woodard Jr. was a decorated World War II veteran who was brutally beaten and blinded while still on uniform on February 12, 1946, just hours after he was honorably discharged from the United States Army.

Ellen and William Craft: the Black Couple Who Disguised Their Way Out of Slavery

The Ellen and William Crafts’ story remains a testimonial to the intelligence, and courage many African-American slaves brought to their determination to be free from enslavement.

Ayuba Suleiman: on His Way to Sell His Slaves, This African Royal Was Abducted and Sold Into Slavery in 1730

Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, also known as Job Ben Solomon, was a prominent Fulani Muslim prince from West Africa who was kidnapped by the Mandinkas and shipped to the Americas during the Atlantic slave trade.

Charles Sumner, the US Senator Who Was Almost Killed for Speaking Against Slavery

The Beating of Charles Sumner, occurred on May 22, 1856, in the United States Senate chamber, when Preston Brooks, used a walking cane to attack Senator Charles Sumner.

James Derham, the first African American to Practice Medicine in the United States

Dr. James Durham has been widely acknowledged as the first recognized African American to practice medicine in the United States.

Denmark Vesey Was Hanged On This Day in 1822 For Planning The Most Extensive Slave Revolt in U.S. History

Denmark Vesey was a self-educated Black man who was hanged alongside his co-conspirators for planning what is today regarded as the most extensive slave rebellion in U.S. history.

On This Day: Rhode Island Enacted Its 1st Law Declaring Slavery Illegal

Slavery in the United States wasn’t abolished at the federal level until after the Civil War, but on this day in history, May 18, 1652, the first anti-slavery statute in the U.S. colonies was passed in what’s now the state of Rhode Island.

Female Slave Traders: Meet Niara Bely, the African Queen Who Doubled as a Slave Trader in the 1800s

Niara Bely Also known as Elizabeth Bailey Gomez, was a African queen who also doubled as a slave trader in nineteenth-century Guinea.
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Modern Slavery: 10 Shocking Facts About Slavery In Mauritania

Slavery in Mauritania is not a thing of the past. The practice persists to this day despite laws abolishing and criminalizing it