transatlantic slave trade

Badu Bonsu II: The Ghanaian King Who Was Beheaded for Rebelling Against the Dutch in 1838

badu-bonsu-ii-this-ghanaian-king-was-hanged-and-beheaded-in-1838-for-rebelling-against-the-dutch

Abdul Rahman Ibrahima: The Fulani Prince Who Was Enslaved in the United States for 40 Years

Abdul Rahman Ibrahima was a Fulani prince from the Fouta Djallon region of Guinea, who was captured and sold into slavery in 1788. After spending 40 years enslaved in the United States, he was freed in 1828 and returned to Africa.

Ellen and William Craft: The Black Couple Who Escaped Slavery by Disguising Themselves

The plan, devised by William, was to utilize Ellen's appearance and have her disguise herself as a wealthy white man traveling with his male slave, William.

Joice Heth: The Enslaved African Who Was Exhibited in Circuses as George Washington’s Childhood Nurse

Joice Heth was an enslaved African woman who found herself thrust into the spotlight as she was exhibited as the purported childhood nurse of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

How Africans Were Lured into Slave Ships by European Slave Traders

During the transatlantic slave trade, European slave traders employed various cunning tactics to lure Africans onto their ships, capitalizing on their vulnerability and ignorance. This article explores the deceptive methods employed by European slavers and the heart-wrenching stories of Africans who were lured into the treacherous journey across the Atlantic.

John Hawkins: The Father of the English Slave Trade and His Infamous Slave Ship, the Jesus of Lübeck

John Hawkins was an English naval commander and merchant who played a significant role in the early development of English involvement in the transatlantic slave trade during the 16th century.

Queen Anne’s Bounty: The Church of England’s Link to the Atlantic Slave Trade

In the 18th century, while the Church preached to Africans about a God in whose image they were made, it funded a company that carted them away from Africa in ten of thousands.

Anti-literacy Laws in the United States Once Prevented Blacks from Getting an Education

Fearing that black literacy would prove a threat to the slave system, whites in many colonies instituted laws forbidding slaves to learn to read or write and making it a crime for others to teach them.

Isabella Gibbons: The African Woman Enslaved by Professors at the University of Virginia

Isabella Gibbons, born around 1836, holds a significant place in history as an African woman who endured the hardships of slavery while working as a cook at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.

African Kingdoms that Actively Participated in the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

While European slave traders were the driving force behind this brutal system, they were not the only participants. African societies also played a role in the capture, sale, and transport of enslaved people.
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